Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for February, 2013

This profile exists in all work environments, not just consulting. But I’ll be honest – it’s rare in my line of work and frankly a little odd. Consultants just have too much pride and passion to fall into this category.

The “It’s just a job!” Guy/Gal

Definition: For those of you who are enjoying a career right now, you know who I’m talking about. This is the kind of person that makes you roll your eyes, huff out of frustration, and/or want to strangle someone. For those of you who don’t know what I’m talking about, here’s an excellent (and hilarious) NSFW explanation by Chris Rock (undoubtedly one of the best comedians of our time).

% of consultants that exhibit this trait: ~1 in every 250

Detailed definition: This type of consultant is one who’s just getting by. They are doing the absolute minimum. They don’t give back to their fellow brethren, you can’t expect them to go above and beyond on anything, and they live the consulting life as if it’s a 9-to-5 job. Once the clock magically strikes 5pm, they are out the door.

I have met only a couple of people like this in my career. I believe I’ve encountered relatively few of these types because most consultants are very passionate about their work and, to be super honest, workaholics. However, having said that, I do feel that a person who starts with a great attitude in consulting can eventually drift this way…

Example 1: The first example is about a young and quiet sort of guy – he literally just faded into the background. You had to give him direction (i.e. micromanage him) or you would find him surfing the internet. Although we don’t have set business hours as consultants, we established some just for him on that project. He showed up ~15 minutes late in the morning and then was out the door a few minutes early. During meetings, I often caught him not paying attention – he looked like his mind was elsewhere. I think he was let go shortly after that project. I will never know what was going on with him – I approached him during a free moment and asked if everything was OK and then hinted that he didn’t seem to be engaged. But he brushed off the encounter and said everything was fine (not that it was really my business anyways).

Example 2: This second person was similar to the first. He was quiet, kept to herself, and was quite…boring. No real personality, no passion. One time our project team invited him to go out with us for drinks after work and he complied, although I have always wondered if he did it out of obligation. He didn’t talk to anyone during the happy hour – he spent most of his time watching the sports bar TV. I also approached him (I was in a management role at the time) and asked him to level with me about what was going on. He first seemed to hesitate but then relayed a personal story that was quite heartbreaking. The management team decided to look the other way on his performance and tried to support him as best as we could.

This story has a happy ending, unlike the first. After his ordeal was over months later, he did a 180. He was infused with new found happiness that spilled over into his career. He stayed with the firm for another 2 years.

Example 3: This example breaks from tradition a bit. In this one I’m going to discuss a client. By the way, the number of clients that portray this profile is much higher – I encounter at least one “jobber” on every project. I assume that this is due to a simple numbers game – corporate workers outnumber consultants by at least 10:1. Also, I have to state the obvious here – the story I’m sharing with you is an extreme example that just happens to manifest itself in a client persona. This story is not meant to encourage a stereotype of people on the client side. I illustrate it because there are some extreme behaviors that are worth noting.

I once encountered a business analyst who had been working for a company for over 10 years when we got there. He was rigid, seemed to be “held back” (i.e. not promoted), and very cantankerous. He was also the only person who could give us the stuff we needed, as it came out of a complex database system that he both created and maintained. At first, I had no clue what I had walked into. But then I saw him roll his eyes when I introduced myself. Instead of addressing it, I continued and asked if he could help us out, although it was clear to both of us that he was the only who could help us and would need to. He waved me away and explained that he “did not have time for this.” (When this happens, we have to go through the management chain to “motivate” people.) After he was given a talking to, we gave him the exact specifications of what we needed. Note that these specifications were based on a rigid document that he had defined and required us to fill out (my guess is that he did this to stall or stop our request). I made sure to fill in every detail and even put in a screen shot of what the final product should look like. But somehow his version of the end product did not look like mine. When I went back to him to request needed adjustments, he started yelling at me and then blamed me for writing a bad spec. We then went through the management chain again. After his second talking to, he fixed most of the issues. Needless to say, I worked with him several more times to finish the task. It was painful, especially since it was hard to get an inch from him on most things…and he left at 4:57pm on the dot everyday.

Aside: after reading the above, some of you may be thinking “maybe he just doesn’t like consultants.” No doubt, and I’m not going to speculate – there were obviously several things going on with this gentleman. Note that he behaved the same way with both peers and consultants. Also note that had been heard saying “It’s just a job!” to co-workers.

Why would a consultant behave in such a manner?

Based on the few people I’ve known, I am going to say there are a couple of causes:

  • Personal reasons
  • Lack of ambition

Consultants seek out this line of work because they have a specific type of creative need. They like to solve problems, be challenged, live the life of a road warrior, and/or exist on a plane that is constantly changing. There is a strong spirit that is alive and well in our community that propels us. People who try consulting and don’t like it leave almost immediately. Therefore, I think personal reasons are the #1 reason why someone’s spirit breaks. I’ve met consultants who have suffered personal loss and hardships during their consulting careers. They check out, but it’s only temporary. They bounce back. But those that don’t – they move on or are asked to move on.

The #2 reason is really directed toward the younger generations who don’t know what they’ve gotten into when they start their consultant path. Once they realize how much ambition and self-stamina you need to survive this career, it either makes or breaks them.

How do you know when a consultant is an “It’s just a job!” Guy/Gal?

The signs are pretty clear: they routinely look/act/talk like they don’t want to be there, they lack focus and attention to detail, they count down the hours before they can leave each day, and they consistently do bad work. In rare instances, you may actually hear them say “It’s just a job!” in defense of a job done poorly.

What can one do about the “It’s just a job!” Guy/Gal?

Clients, your course of action is to tell the consulting management team and let them handle it. It is really up to the consulting firm to deal with their own people.

For consulting firms, I think there are 2 true options here:

  1. Have a heart to heart with them and find out why they don’t value their job. Maybe they lack motivation, skill, or the necessary tools they need to do their job efficiently. Then support them.
  2. -and if #1 doesn’t work- Encourage them to leave that particular position or company.

The bottom line comes down to this…us consultants have a certain level of autonomy in our line of work and we are expected to create our own opportunity and then walk that pathway ourselves. If someone’s heart isn’t into it, this is most definitely the wrong career choice.

Cheers,

The Traveling Consultant

Advertisements

Read Full Post »